On Saturday, I spoke at a parent event hosted by Northridge Church in Plymouth, Michigan. I experienced amazing hosts and 550 receptive parents all day long. During the day, I was asked great questions by moms and dads that I plan to blog about this week. The question below came from a woman who is both a mother and a

A few weeks ago, a story made its way across America about a small, private school football team in Grapevine, Texas that did something very unusual. They were scheduled to play a juvenile detention center in football, Gainesville State School the next Friday. They knew that those young inmates would have no one cheering for them in the stands, no

I have worked with students for thirty years. Idistinctly remember when bullying became a topic of discussion across the American education landscape. It was around 1995, the same time social scientists began to measure bullying on the school campus. The issue of “no bullies” became vogue for a while. Then, for years, it seemed we didn’t hear about it. Now—it’s back

Sometimes I get misunderstand as a guy who’s against kids. Since publishing my latest book, Generation iY—Our Last Chance to Save heir Future, some think I whine about how this generation of students are undisciplined and feel entitled. Actually, this couldn’t be further from the truth. I love this generation of students. But they’re in trouble. More than you may think. According

The revolts and protests we’re hearing about every day in the news have a few ingredients in common. Have you noticed them? - They are led by a swelling population of young adults. - They occur when youth have too much time on their hands. - They happen when established leaders don’t know how to lead them. “Young people without jobs, young people who

The rest of this week, I plan to blog about what’s on the mind of young adults today, the ones from Generation Y (born 1984-2002). In addition to our research with college students, Pew Research and Barna Reports have given us the latest read on this emerging generation and their affect on our culture. If you’re a parent, teacher, coach

An AP article by Pat Walters reported, “A high school English teacher in suburban Philadelphia who was suspended for a blog in which she called her young charges "disengaged, lazy whiners" is driving a debate by daring to ask: Why are today's students unmotivated — and what's wrong with calling them out? As she fights to keep her job at Central

Yesterday, I started a list of ideas adults can use to help teens and young adults grow up. Our society, which used to be part of the solution -- is now part of the problem in why these kids stall and fail to mature until their late twenties. These twenty-somethings have gone through our school systems and come out ill-equipped. Somehow,

I just heard from an admissions staff member at Harvard University. He told me he interviewed a prospective student recently and had an unusual experience. During the interview the student would answer his questions, then look down after each one. The staff member assumed the student was just a bit shy. But, alas, it was something else. He was looking

Some stuff you need to know as a leader -- you learn quickly. Others, you just learn over the years. As I travel and speak at schools, corporations, non-profit organizations, and churches, I see adults trying too hard to connect with young people. And there is a gap. Teachers and parents become frustrated at the lack of connection and good

I was privileged to be apart of the Leadership and Influence Summit 2010 earlier this month, and thought I would share the video I taped for them incase you were unable to watch when they aired it. They asked for me to talk about understanding Generation iY in the workplace, and to give you a glimpse into who they are.

There’s something you should know about these young employees who are just now gracing your workplace. In many ways, the newest hires are not like Generation X or the Baby Boomers before them. They are Generation iY, who grew up in the “I” world, online. Their world has produced a set of expectations that leaders should recognize. Below is a

I have the privilege of meeting fairly regularly with an extremely intelligent man named Mark Bauerlein. Mark is a writer for The Wall Street Journal, he’s authored numerous books and he’s a faculty member at Emory University in Atlanta. This last time we met, I brought a camera man. I wanted to get Mark’s observations on students today, the kids that

I have the privilege of meeting fairly regularly with an extremely intelligent man named Mark Bauerlein. Mark is a writer for The Wall Street Journal, he’s authored numerous books and he’s a faculty member at Emory University in Atlanta. This last time we met, I brought a camera man. I wanted to get Mark’s observations on students today, the kids that

There’s something you should know about these young employees who are just now gracing your workplace. In many ways, the newest hires are not like Generation X or the Baby Boomers before them. They are Generation iY, who grew up in the “I” world, online. Their world has produced a set of expectations that leaders should recognize. Below is a

Last week, the New York Times ran an article called, “What is it About Twenty-Somethings?” It was a treatment of the rising population who are aptly called “emerging adults” by author Jeffrey Jensen Arnett. You can find the article here on lemondrop. The article cleverly shares 10 clues that you really are a twenty-something, including: You plan to move back home

Yesterday, I began a list of observations that will help adults better understand and guide students today. Let me suggest another couple of observations about Generation iY: Observation #2: They want an experience before an explanation. Author, Leonard Sweet, describes today’s culture and its young people as EPIC: Experiential, Participatory, Image-rich, and Connected. Teachers must remember that a lecture isn’t enough anymore

Because of the rapid cycles of change we’re experiencing these days, I propose that we must rethink how we connect with students every four years. Let me suggest a few. The following observations are about Generation iY that may help you as you attempt to communicate and connect with students today. Observation #1: They want to belong before they believe. Today’s student

I am certain you’ve heard some of the same stories I’ve heard over the last ten years. In communities around America, local hardware stores have been driven out of business by the entrance of a new Home Depot in town. Communities feel a similar impact when a Walmart sets up shop in town. Local discount stores just can’t compete with

I had the privilege of doing a webinar this afternoon for a great group of youth workers in Alaska. Part of our discussion was on the fact that today’s students represent a generation of paradox. Although many of them are advanced biologically, cognitively, and socially, they are often stunted in their emotional growth. Here are seven observations I’ve made: Paradox One:  They