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Generation iY Students Who Don’t Fit the Mold (Part Two)

This week I am blogging about students from Generation iY (those born since 1990) who don’t fit the stereotype: they’re not lazy or entitled, not addicted to rewards, and they have a good work ethic. Today—I plan to venture over to India.

generation iy

You probably know, India has a relatively young population. The mean age hovers around 27 years old. Many of those kids are not “lazy slackers,” in fact, they’re just the opposite. They push themselves so hard to get ahead and to become something, they are experiencing both stress and distress.

Many teens and twenty-somethings are in IT jobs and are pushed to make money for their family or their future. (Not a common thing in America). The industry has moved to “outcome based” rewards meaning they get paid only as they produce. It’s a cut-throat industry, just like American companies who pay on commission and create workaholics. The difference is—in India, some can actually lose money if they don’t perform. What is the result?

Doctors say enormous amount of stress is resulting in early onset of blood pressure, diabetes, urine infections and cardiac diseases. “They are down with depression, lack of sleep and excess sleep. In addition to this, girls are reporting polycystic ovary syndrome, which in turn could result in infertility problems later on,” Dr Prashanti Raju, a physician with wellness clinic, of CARE Hospitals group, says.

Further, in the multi-generational workforce of the IT industry, there is a distinct difference in the tolerance levels between Gen-X (born 1960-1980) and Gen-Y (born between 1980-2000). Gen-Y is more vulnerable to the pressure than Gen-X.

“Gen-Y is exposed to a higher cost of living that puts tremendous pressure on their financial needs. Today you see the Gen-Y employees not even hesitating to put more than 60-70 per cent of their income to buy a bike, a car or swanky phone or even a flat,” Raj Reddy, Senior Vice-President and Chief HR Officer of CSS Corp, feels.

If this feels familiar to your pressurized situation—may I offer some advice?

1. Change Your Scorecard.

If you’re caught up in the rat race, you’ll become addicted to comparing yourself to others. On your own, choose your own scorecard, and become comfortable with performing against it, not someone else’s iPhone, home, job or income.

2. Seek Work-Life Balance.

The concept of work and life is also blurred now with social media giving rise to an ‘Always-On’ generation. This further puts more pressure as there is no switch-off time available through out the day. Turn it off, and find ways to de-compress.

3. Find a Partner to Hold You Accountable.

If you plan to get off the fast-paced treadmill, you should not do it alone. Find a friend who can support you and hold you accountable to this “new lifestyle.” You’ll need someone on the journey with you to prevent you from caving.

4. Sleep and Exercise.

The top two elements in a healthy life (outside of spiritual commitments you can make) are sleep and exercise. Most of us don’t get enough of either of these. They will aid in navigating your high-pressure personality and keep you healthy.

What else would you recommend to this kind of young person?

 

4 Comments

  1. John Meese on August 21, 2013 at 9:12 am

    Great post! I would add a further piece of advice: realize where you stand.
    I was one of these abnormal Generation iY members who started working full time when I was 15 and never stopped, even working full time while putting myself through college. For years I felt huge amounts of stress due to the pressure I felt like was being put on me that really was all in my mind.
    The minute I realized that I was pushing myself in a way that few in my generation do, and that there was so much to learn from every step of this, I became less obsessed with the outcome and began to really enjoy my success. That’s something I want every all-star member of generation iY to experience.

    • John Meese on August 21, 2013 at 9:15 am

      Of course, there’s a fine line hear for the Faith-focused individual. It’s a constant balancing act to acknowledge success and value the work put into something, while maintaining humility and avoiding self-deceiving pride.

      • Tim Elmore on August 21, 2013 at 10:09 am

        Great insight John. I admire your work-ethic and perspective, and appreciate your willingness to share what you’ve learned. Thanks for being an all-star member of Gen. iY!

  2. Sebs | MaximizingMarriage.com on August 22, 2013 at 7:01 pm

    Great insights! Thanks for sharing.

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Generation iY Students Who Don’t Fit the Mold (Part Two)