Search the site

ebook slider-.99

ebook slider-.99

5 Comments

  1. Bill on December 23, 2014 at 8:46 am

    Tim this is very fascinating. What do you think a system that doesn’t allow for an opportunity to cheat would look like? I ask that because I think part of the problem is that the means of measuring knowledge encourages students to achieve those measures whether or not actual learning has occurred. I am not making excuses for students who cheat, but they learned it somewhere.

    • Tim Elmore on December 31, 2014 at 1:48 pm

      You bring up some great questions, Bill… questions I don’t feel any one person can answer. However, I can give my perspective.

      As Dave mentioned below, cheating is a part of human nature. I don’t necessarily think we will ever fully eliminate the desire for people to find the easiest means of getting ahead. However, I do believe we as adults must let students own their education rather than rent it, and one way to accomplish this is by teaching the “Why” before the “What”. If students understand the reason behind learning a subject matter and how it will improve their future, they will be more apt to not cheat and actually learn the material.

      Another component I believe a system should include to dissuade cheating is some form of character or leadership education. That’s why we at Growing Leaders have created Habitudes®: Images That Form Leadership Habits & Attitudes. I believe it’s our duty as adults to help today’s students gain the leadership and life skills they need and help students choose the values they want to direct their lives with. If we engrain ideas of honesty and self-discipline into their learning at a young age, I believe we can help them overcome the desire to cheat.

      I hope this helps.
      -Tim

  2. Dave on December 23, 2014 at 8:50 am

    Understand that cheating is a problem, but also think our system encourages it by forcing students to learn some information that is not important. We, and I’m an educator, do a poor job of explaining why they need to learn certain things thus promoting cheating as a way to get through the useless more quickly.

    • Tim Elmore on December 31, 2014 at 1:26 pm

      Good point, Dave. Thank you for sharing. I believe much of the information students learn in school is important, but like you said, they don’t understand the reason behind learning it. For years I’ve encouraged adults to teach the “Why” before the “What”.

  3. ZacharyHWilcox on April 15, 2021 at 7:37 am

    Hello, I have recently become a dad and it is my first time having a child. I don’t know how to become a good dad and for that, I used to read about it online. I was looking for the $2 deposit casino online and while searching, I have found your post in which you have shared an article on 3 mistakes we make leading kids and it is a very good article. I will surely take care about those mistakes. Thanks.

Leave a Comment