Fourteen thousand students in California were surveyed recently. Each of their schools had given out awards to students for school attendance. The goal, of course, was to highlight the importance of showing up every day. What researchers discovered, in retrospect, was enlightening. Many of the students who received the award, started attending school less often. In other words, the reward did not

I recently read a report that congress passed legislation this summer for landmark spending on social and emotional learning for American students. It represents $260 million in what congress calls the Whole Child Initiative. This means our federal government believes it needs to spend money on kids beyond the education of reading, writing and arithmetic alone. This is amazing. In an era

I recently had the privilege of meeting with parents and grandparents to discuss parenting styles across the country and through the years. As you might imagine, we laughed a lot at how times have changed—and how parenting methods and priorities have shifted as well. We had four generations represented in the room: Builder Generation—born between 1929-1945 Baby Boomer Generation—born between 1946-1964

I found myself talking about “generational diversity in the workplace” twice during podcasts recently. In response, I’ve had young leaders send a specific question: “How do you lead someone from an older generation who is, well…different from you?” It’s a good question. Generational diversity in the workplace can be just as challenging as ethnic, economic or gender diversity. But I know

It’s September and already, I’ve heard from a teacher who was ambushed by an upset parent in a hallway after school. Students and faculty were all around when an argument surfaced that failed to reach any resolution and, in fact, only built walls between the teacher and parent. All they accomplished was venting. Most of the time, both teachers and parents