I spoke to an audience of university students on the topic of leadership. Afterward, I got coffee with several students and discussed what it meant to be an “emerging adult” in today’s culture. One of the students stood out in the midst of the others. He was a minimalist. He chose to not buy into the commercial push for more

I’ve noticed something about my generation of established leaders. Wanna know what it is? We like control and we don’t want to let go of it. USA Today recently ran a cover article about this very reality. A growing number of Baby Boomer and Builder generation leaders who are at retirement age are choosing to stay in the game. And why

Impulse. It’s a term we hear more and more these days. And that’s probably because we see it all around us, in our daily lives. Impulsive shopping and purchases Impulsive eating Impulsive messages posted on social media Impulsive drinking Impulsive hookups Impulsive marriages and divorces Now that I think about it, much of our daily conduct falls into one of two

Have you ever wondered why people act a certain way that may seem strange to you? Why does that executive assistant refuse to smile and not respond to emails? How come my boss gets so tense once a month? And why does the shipping room manager become aggressive in the afternoons? The “freshman” year of my career over thirty years ago,

Today, I’m thrilled to share a conversation with Dr. Ken Blanchard. Dr. Blanchard is a leadership expert, speaker, and author. His New York Times best-selling book, The One Minute Manager, has sold over 13 million copies. Dr. Ken Blanchard will also be a speaker at our National Leadership Forum this summer in Atlanta. Here are some highlights from our conversation. https://growingleaders.com/podcast/Resources/Dr.Ken.Blanchard.mp3 Tim

During the third year of my career, my senior supervisor was terminated. Suddenly, the board of directors was faced with a vacancy in the executive position, and was charged with selecting a new leader. It would take months. While I was still a young twenty-something, they asked me to serve in the interim. I was both flattered and stunned. How could

Recently, I listened in on a fascinating conversation, hosted by Jackson-Spalding, a marketing communications agency in Atlanta. My dear friend, Glen Jackson, invited two executives to speak, both who had much to say about communicating during a time of crisis. They shared lessons every leader can apply in their own time of crises. Their names were Frank Blake and Brad Shaw.

Over the last three decades, I have visited just over fifty countries in the world. Like millions of others, I love international travel because it affords such an education on the diversity of our world—ethnically, linguistically and geographically. German culture is so different than what I found in Argentina . . . and other places in Latin America. African nations

Everywhere I travel, I meet parents who are interested in developing leadership qualities in their children—regardless of the child’s age. Many have concluded that thinking and acting like a genuine, servant-leader is a differentiator in today’s graduate. If we hope to develop our kids, we’ve got to find ways to communicate in a language they understand. We must become relevant to

Get ready. Just when you thought you knew the touchscreen generation, they got younger on you. Not only are attention spans decreasing and multi-tasking increasing, but children are intuitively using tablets and portable devices at one year old. Yes, that’s right—one year old. In a recent publication of the Journal, Pediatrics, researchers found “almost universal exposure” to tablets and the use

For too long, today’s generation of adults (both parents and teachers) have unwittingly set students up for failure and disappointment. How? As they grew up, we made statements to our kids without thinking of the long-term implications of our words. For years, we told them they were “Awesome!” and gave them a trophy just for showing up on a team—without thinking they

Today I'm excited to share a guest post from Dr. Ken Blanchard. Dr. Blanchard is a leadership expert, speaker, and author. His New York Times best-selling book, The One Minute Manager, has sold over 13 million copies. Dr. Ken Blanchard will also be a speaker at our National Leadership Forum this summer in Atlanta. Learn more about Dr. Blanchard and the National

Today is National Teacher Appreciation Day. So, I am dedicating this piece to the teachers who change the lives of students each and every day—without a word of thanks from their recipients. Teachers are unsung heroes. Teachers spend themselves emotionally and often are not remunerated adequately. So, I am voicing my appreciation to them in a different sort of way.