Follow @TimElmore Today, I have a special treat for you. For several years, I've had the privilege of getting to know Dr. Carol Dweck and her groundbreaking work describing the "growth mindset." I believe her message is one every student needs. In light of having her as a speaker at our National Leadership Forum this June, I wanted to share her TED Talk with you. It's called "The

Follow @TimElmore I find myself talking to high school and college students about personal branding all the time. Brands and labels are so much a part of our culture today. In fact, many companies actually hire Brand Managers, whose job is to insure that they company’s brand is solidly embedded into the psyche of the American consumer for their industry. Have you

Follow @TimElmore Today—I’d like to start a conversation. It’s about long-term thinking, and it’s inspired by a move that NFL player Chris Borland recently made. There is a deeper principle behind the move… and it has two sides to it. I want to know your thoughts. Perhaps you heard the news: San Francisco 49ers linebacker Chris Borland recently retired from football… at 24 years

Follow @TimElmore In February, I led a workshop at the National “First Year Experience” conference in Dallas. Several university staff spoke to me afterward about how difficult student development has become with college freshmen. One advisor said she was viewed as a “mean and nasty” person because she suggested first-year students needed to improve their people skills or study skills. According to

Developmental psychologists have reminded us for years that people learn in different ways. Students, for instance, may be auditory learners, visual learners or kinesthetic learners—but all have to sit in the same classroom with a teacher who cannot possibly invest the time to specialize in each learning style. In fact, most educators lean toward utilizing the pedagogy they prefer themselves. When

Follow @TimElmore I am asked a form of this question multiple times a week: “What do I do with students’ addiction to technology?” Faculty, coaches, parents, youth workers and employers are often miffed at kids who sit with their heads down, gazing at the screen of a smart phone. Preoccupation with a phone has been proven to be an addiction, a coping mechanism

This week, I’m blogging about the virtue of courage (specifically, how we build courage in students today). Courage has always been challenging to cultivate. We humans tend to shrink from doing what is difficult, unpopular or may garner enemies. However, it’s my belief that our society today makes displaying courage especially hard. (I listed five reasons why our world discourages

Follow @TimElmore We live in a day when adults are pushing kids to discover their strengths and focus their lives. Thanks to the Gallup organization and author Marcus Buckingham, we have learned to concentrate on building strengths and to only play in that space. Not surprisingly, this has caused parents to hone our styles and launch our kids into football, ballet,

Part of becoming educated is to learn from people, books, podcasts and other sources you don’t completely agree with—while being able to “eat the fish and spit out the bones.” You know what I mean, don’t you? For me, it means reading after authors who have expertise and perspective on issues that lie far outside my strengths or opinions. It means

All of our lives, we’ve heard stories of people who are “outliers.” Men and women who dropped out of college (or never attended in the first place) and made their mark on the world anyway—people like Bill Gates, Oprah Winfrey, Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg, Ted Turner, Walt Disney, Wolfgang Puck… and the list goes on and on. The fact is, less

I just finished a broadcast for Georgia Public Radio, where I conversed with Bobbie Battista about orienting Millennials into the workforce. It was lively because we had two Millennials with us in the studio—Tina and Adrian. (They are both members of Generation iY, the younger half of the millennial population). While the four of us possessed different perspectives on these new