Yesterday, I posted Part One of this series on how schools and parents can actually experience collaboration instead of conflict. If you missed it, check out the first five ideas I provided for K-12 schools, colleges, athletic programs or other student organizations that want to deepen the partnership between parents and staff. Today, let’s examine three more ideas: 6. Whenever You Meet,

My colleague, Holly Moore, had to visit the emergency room at a local hospital this past week. She is fine, but she learned a valuable lesson through the visit. When examined, the nurse never once looked her in the eye, never spoke to her about anything personal, and never expressed any concern for her condition. She just took the vital signs

I am sure you’ve reflected on the tragic shootings that took place at an ordinary cinema in Aurora, Colorado last week. I used to live in Aurora, not ten minutes from that theatre. It’s a little freaky to think about it. There are probably dozens of lessons to be learned from this homicide, but I’d like to focus on just one. 

I constantly try to offer insights into how our leadership of students must change. Lately, we’ve drifted from providing engaging leadership and our kids are victims. Even when we cover issues that are helpful, we bore them to tears. Consider this fact. Some of the world’s most creative geniuses hated the instruction they received in school. Thomas Edison once said his

Over the next few days, I’d like to furnish some perspective on how leading students is different today than, let’s say, when I was a kid. It isn’t that the adolescent brain is different or their needs are different. Fundamentally, kids are kids no matter when they’re born, but their surroundings, expectations, and privileges are different today, requiring us to

Today is a guest post by Dr. Meg Meeker.  Pediatrician, mother and best-selling author of six books, Dr. Meg Meeker is the country’s leading authority on parenting, teens and children’s health.  To learn more about Dr. Meeker, visit her website at www.megmeekermd.com or follow her on Twitter @megmeeker. Over the past 25 years that I’ve practiced adolescent medicine, I have had

Over the last three days of June, our team hosted a packed house of educators and organizational leaders at our National Leadership Forum, and a Habitudes One-Day Intensive both held in Atlanta. Our theme was: Growing Leaders Not Just Graduates. We talked about building leaders at every level—staff, faculty and student. I’ve been musing about my greatest “take aways” from the National

The late John Gardener, former Secretary of Housing, Education and Welfare was a man ahead of his time. He said years ago that one of his chief concerns about the educational system in America is that it’s unwittingly injecting students with an “anti-leadership vaccine.” It sort of paints a picture, doesn’t it?  He saw the direction education was going, making

I am enjoying some much-needed vacation time this week with my family. To continue providing some thoughts for you on leading the next generation—I decided to re-post some popular blog posts from the past two years. Hope you enjoy them. "Communicate or Stagnate" continues to be one of the most popular posts on my blog. Often, we think we are communicating

  Happy Fourth of July! I hope you have an opportunity to celebrate with family and friends today. I'm thankful for those who have sacrificed to give us the freedom we enjoy. I'm on vacation with my family this week. I'll be re-posting some of my most popular blogs the rest of this week. Next week, I'll resume my regular blogging

I am enjoying some much-needed vacation time this week with my family. To continue providing some thoughts for you on leading the next generation—I decided to re-post some popular blog posts from the past two years. Hope you enjoy them. "The Starving Baker for Teachers" continues to be one of the most popular posts on my blog. Everyone knows that they

My friend, Paul Borthwick, recently interviewed a young adult on the subject of how his generation will handle philanthropy based on current attitudes and values. Paul’s guest blog is below. I thought you might like to read these words from a twenty-something responding to questions I asked about raising funds from the under-30 crowd. The remarks are quite blunt (probably a